Community-Based Planning

The following are examples of HACBED’s work in the area of supporting community-based planning:

  • Transit Oriented Community-Based Economic Development (TOCBED) – a partnership between HACBED, the University of Hawai`i’s Department of Urban & Regional Planning and Social Policy Center, and Plan Pacific (a planning consulting firm) to research previous plans and studies, contact area businesses and residents, and conduct surveys and facilitate community forums to explore broad-based “grassroots” planning models to assist three urban neighborhoods – Central Kaka`ako, Ala Moana-Sheridan-Kaheka, and McCully-Mō`ili`ili to [1] articulate preferred scenarios for social and economic revitalization; [2] build these communities’ capacity to implement a strategic plan for their preferred future; and [3] assist State and county policymakers in developing a master plan to integrate transit-development opportunities with state-federal and local programs that address the needs of urban communities with a strong ethnic-historic heritage, and capitalize on public institutional assets.  The work resulted in a report, Honolulu’s Cultural Heritage Corridor: A Strategic Vision & Development Framework For Central Kaka`ako, Ala Moana-Sheridan-Kaheka, & McCully-Mō`ili`ili that provided recommendations for a [a] governance structure and [b] mitigating impacts and addressing development opportunities through community based initiatives.  The initiative was funded by the City & County of Honolulu and the State Legislature.
  • Lanaians For Sensible Growth – provide process design, research, facilitation, and technical support to a community-based planning initiative to establish a development framework for the Lāna‘i community that will be used to negotiate a community benefits agreement and assess future planning and development efforts on the island. The process included use of ‘ohana dialogue sessions (family to family talk story sessions using a popular education methodology), Speak Outs, a door to door survey, and community gatherings.
  • Empower O`ahu – designed and conducted community and regional strategic planning processes in 9 communities as part of the City & County of Honolulu’s federal HUD Empowerment Zone application process in 1998 and 2000. HACBED then served as fiscal sponsor and management agent for the implementation phase of this island-wide initiative to create opportunities for residents in low/moderate income communities on O`ahu.  The 9 communities are investing and leveraging $4 million in City/federal resources for community development.
  • Workforce Development Community Audits – a study conducted for the O`ahu Workforce Investment Board to promote strategic workforce investment decisions through the analysis of areas on O`ahu where residents would benefit from investments of OWIB resources and activities; high growth industries that can employ new workers and support entrepreneurship; and industries that can provide high wages and career ladders to create upward mobility for low income individuals.
  • State Office of Youth Services – in partnership with UH-DURP, HACBED worked with OYS on a two-year education, training, and facilitation project to expand the capacity of the agency to plan and establish a community-building approach to the development of a continuum of youth services statewide. Part of this effort is to develop a strategic plan for the Office within the context of this strategic focus.
  • Community Visioning in FSM & Palau – through a contract with The Nature Conservancy, the Governors’ Association of Palau, the Palau Conservation Society, and the Conservation Society of Pohnpei, HACBED provided trainings and technical assistance for officials from federal, state, and municipal governments, NGOs, and traditional leaders on community visioning for sustainable development.